Wild West
Obviously, many of the white characters in the original Wild West epos were, in a certain sense, outcasts or refugees from “civilization”, but the main thing in their position was,…

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8 SIGNS OF THE PRESENT COWBOY
The word "cowboy" is fixed in English since 1725. It meant the rider hired to watch over the herd. During the time of the American Revolution (1775–1783), the word sounded…

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Cowboy: The History of the American Symbol
The word cowboy, consisting of two words - cow (cow) and boy (boy), literally translated as "cow boy." In our understanding, something like a shepherd. It is known that it…

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Wild West Saloons

A winged door saloon is a traditional interior element of saloons that existed in the Wild West and are now pleasing to the eye on the territory of western films. In English, they are called “batwing doors,” that is, “bat-wing-doors” that open in both directions. However, America is a very large country, in its northern regions the doors in cowboy taverns always tightly closed the doorway so that cold air did not penetrate it. Of course, the north is practical, but not too romantic and cinematic, so the southern version of the door structure, which helped to carry out ventilation in a hot room and allowed a passerby from the street to understand what fun flares up inside, was fixed in the minds of a simple layman. At the same time, wing-doors provided visitors with the opportunity to effectively enter a bar-saloon open for cowboys, hunters, rangers, gold prospectors, miners, travelers, card players, bandits and other American populations of two centuries ago.

Wild West Saloons

The appearance of the first bar-cafe-saloon dates back to 1822, when an institution for trappers appeared in the city of Brown Hall, Wyoming. So in the United States called hunters for fur animals. Although the trapper saloons quickly gained popularity, having turned from an ordinary tavern for tired hunters into a drinking and entertainment establishment for any client who had money in his pocket.

The popularity of the Wild West saloons can be estimated even by this fact: in the town of Livingston, Montana, by the year 1880, 33 such restaurants had formed, with a total urban population of three thousand. And this is a standard situation for America in the second half of the nineteenth century, where the saloon bar at the same time allowed you to drink, eat, play darts, bowling, billiards, dice or card games, as well as watch the dancing of young cheerful girls accompanied by musical parties on the piano.

After historical information, it’s time to move on to visualizing the image, for which below there is a wonderful collection of photographs of cowboys in the saloons of the wild west. The presented photos of real cowboys in bars of the 19th and early 20th centuries are about 100-150 years old and we should be glad that almost simultaneously with the advent of saloon bars, the art of photography was born to capture memorable scenes for the history of how a cowboy’s people rested from their workdays.

Wild West Show
After losing the election in November, Hickcock took off the sheriff's star and left Hayes. But this city did not seem to let him go. Wild Bill returned to Haze…

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Cowboy
Cowboy (cowboy) (English cowboy, from cow - "cow" and boy - "guy") - the name used in the Wild West of the United States in relation to the herdsmen of…

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Mastering the Wild West
An advertisement with a cowboy smoking a cigarette with a filter and claiming that the cigarette filter does not affect the taste of tobacco was presented to the clients. This…

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Cowboys and Coffins
Cowboys worked on the ranchers of livestock producers and were engaged in detour of the ranch territory, repairing fences, searching for cows strayed from the herd, marking young and many…

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